Wednesday, July 04, 2012

Ruminate about the unfolding mysteries of life

The Anchorhold site encourages spiritual expressions of gay and bisexual men. Today David Townsend blogs "Signs and Wonders " about consulting Tarot cards before setting out yesterday. After describing cards he turns over, Townsend writes:
"Then I settled into the slower, more ambiguous search for what these cards could tell me, digging into the uncertainties, looking in the shadows cast by hesitation for what I might otherwise fail to see. Reading your cards, or having them for you, requires a kind of faith. You have to trust that a series of random occurrences has something to teach you — that hovering just behind pure chance is a sign that points to something you'd do well to notice. You have to get past calculating the odds in order to embrace what Thomas Moore has called 'the re-enchantment of everyday life.'
You don't have to believe deeply. You just have to behave as though you do. You have to give yourself permission to imagine and play with the possibility that the randomness of the world is speaking to you. You can use the Tarot as a technology for the expansion of your soul. You could just as well use astrology; or the I Ching; or ink blots; or the pattern of the flowers that have opened this particular summer day, in this particular meadow. The truth isn't in the cards, but in the dialogue you have with them — a dialogue that can both take you out of yourself and invite you to enter more deeply into yourself."
Townsend concludes, "There's no objective, 'scientific' truth to the Tarot, as far as I'm concerned, but there is what it calls forth in us as we play with what it offers. The chance happenings of my day aren't direct messages from a God who has nothing more pressing to do than send me personal telegrams; but I can choose to take them as evidence of a Mystery that unfolds before me, and, sometimes, an invitation to allow it to unfold within me as well."

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